We use cookies to provide you the best experience on our website. You can disable the cookies in your browser setting. If you continue to use the site without changing your settings, we will assume that you are happy to accept all the cookies used on this site.

Please refer to our Terms of Use for further details on cookies. Terms of Use

Through the following links, you can skip to the menu or to the main text in this page.

Respecting Human Rights

Basic Policies Regarding Human Rights

The Kubota Group supports the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, respects the human rights of all people, and does not discriminate or violate human rights on the basis of nationality, race, age, gender, sexual orientation, gender identity or disability, or for any other reason.
The Kubota Group does not permit forced labor or child labor, and also requests that its business partners comply in this regard. These policies are declared in the KUBOTA Group Charter for Action & Code of Conduct and put into practice.


Code of Conduct (excerpts)

  • We support the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, and respect the human rights of all people.
  • We do not discriminate or violate human rights on the basis of nationality, race, age, gender, sexual orientation or gender identity,* disability, or for any other reason.
    * The concept of how one perceives one’s own gender.
  • We do not permit forced labor or child labor, and also request our business partners to comply in this regard.

Human Rights Advancement System

Kubota has a Human Rights Advancement Planning & Coordination Committee headed by the director in charge of CSR Planning & Coordination Headquarters. Its members at each Kubota site are promoting activities based on the human rights advancement activity policies. At the beginning of each fiscal year, a meeting is held gathering the committee members of all sites.
Besides the committee members, a human rights advancement leader is appointed at each site, who leads the human rights advancement activities of the site.


Human Rights Advancement Planning & Coordination Committee


Human Rights Education

Aiming to create a harassment-free, worker-friendly workplace environment, Kubota plans and provides human rights education programs for all employees, including President and Directors, every year, based on the human rights advancement activity policies.
It is now possible to receive human rights education from overseas via a video conference system. The education programs include rank-based training, such as training for new employees, and human rights education provided at each site. Employees who are unable to receive such programs can receive education via a video conference system, or study by themselves using DVDs, textbooks, and FAQs.
In FY2018, all Kubota employees (in terms of the total number of participants) in Japan received human rights education through internal training or training offered by external organizations.


[Results of Internal Training in 2018]

  Internal training External training Total
Kubota 13,899 people 389 people 14,288 people
Group companies in Japan 8,310 people 110 people 8,420 people

Major Internal Education Programs

Training for directors and managers 187 people (including presidents, etc. of Group companies in Japan)
Training for new employees 1,090 people (including those from Group companies in Japan)
Training for newly appointed foremen 14 people (including those from Group companies in Japan)
Training for newly appointed supervisors 36 people (including those from Group companies in Japan)
Seminar for harassment consultation office personnel 70 people (including those from Group companies in Japan)
Fieldwork training for human rights leaders 37 people (including those from Group companies in Japan, etc.)
Training for expatriates 25 people
  • The figures include temporary and re-hired employees.
  • Education programs are held at each Group company in Japan.
  • For the hearing-impaired, DVD transcripts (or a DVD with subtitles) or lecture texts are provided in advance, so that they can receive training with other participants in the same room. Directors and


Major Education Themes
  • Prevention of harassment (Sexual harassment, maternity harassment,(*1) power harassment, or harassment against sexual minorities (LGBT,(*2) SOGI,(*3) etc.), etc.)
  • Responses to harassment counseling for superiors
  • Social discrimination (Dowa) (such as online discrimination towards minority groups (e.g. Buraku), etc.)
  • Issues facing the disabled (Act to Advance the Elimination of Discrimination against the Disabled, the disabled employment ratio, etc.)
  • Issues facing foreign residents in Japan (hate-based harassment, etc.)
  • UK Modern Slavery Act
  • The supply chain and human rights (SDGs)
  • Various human rights issues (such as color vision variations and universal color design)
  • Results of surveys on CSR awareness
  • Revision of the employment regulations, etc. associated with the revision of the Equal Employment Opportunities Act and the Child Care and Family Care Leave Act
  • 1 Harassment relating to pregnancy, childbirth, childcare leave, etc.
  • 2 Acronym of lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender
  • 3 SO (sexual orientation), GI (gender identity).

Major External Training
Kubota also encourages its employees to proactively participate in seminars hosted by corporate organizations addressing human rights issues and government organs.

Examples:
Dowa and Human Rights Issue Awareness-Raising Seminar (for management-level employees) hosted by the Corporate Federation for Dowa and Human Rights Issues: 10 participants
Dowa and Human Rights Issue Awareness-Raising Introductory Seminar hosted by the Sakai City Human Rights Education Promotion Council: 94 participants
The 38th Human Rights and Dowa Issue Corporate Awareness-Raising Seminar hosted by the Executive Committee(*4): 42 participants (including those from Group companies in Japan)
The 48th Buraku Liberation and Human Rights Summer Seminar hosted by the Executive Committee(*4): 13 participants (including those from Group companies in Japan), etc.
  • 4 Hosted by Osaka Prefecture, Osaka City, Buraku Liberation and Human Rights Research Institute, etc.


Directors and Managers Human Rights Training (Aug 6, 2018)
(Theme: Human rights issues in global corporations – The supply chain and human rights)
(Lecturer: Yozo Yokota, President of the Center for Human Rights Education and Training)


Kubota Headquarters Human Rights Training (Oct 17, 2018)
(Lecturer: Hiroyuki Ikenaga, General Manager of the Human Rights Advancement Department, CSR Planning & Coordination Headquarters)


Kubota Hokkaido Regional Office Human Rights Training(July 30, 2018)
(Lecturer: Ryo Tamura, Head of Human Rights Awareness Division, Human Rights Awareness Department, CSR Planning & Coordination Headquarters)

Consultation Office System

As remedial action for victims of human rights violation, Kubota established the Kubota Hotline?a whistleblowing system that includes the use of outside lawyers?and consultation office systems at each of its bases, including those overseas, thereby enabling it to respond swiftly to any issues that may arise.

Number of cases reported on human rights issues (including harassment) in 2018: 67 (21 of which were recognized)


Harassment Consultation Office Personnel Seminar (July 10, 2018)
(Lecturer: Satomi Kuwano, CEO, Business Partner Office)


[Whistleblowing System (Kubota Hotline)]

We distribute pocket cards with contact details and introduce such offices through the Company intranet, posters, email magazines, human rights seminars, and so on.


[Consultation Office System in Japan]

Each year, Kubota holds a seminar for harassment consultation office personnel inviting external lecturers, with the aim of improving their counseling ability and preventing secondary victimization. A total of 70 employees, focusing on newly appointed supervisors and including those who participated via a video conference system, took part in this seminar in 2018.
The seminar focused on enabling the participants to take prompt and appropriate action against many types of harassment, such as sexual, power, or maternity harassment, or harassment against sexual minorities, without causing any disadvantage to the informant.

Activities to Raise Human Rights Awareness

In order to enhance awareness of human rights, Kubota invites human rights-related slogans from all Japan-based employees, including those from Group companies in Japan, every year, and awards excellent slogans during Human Rights Week, which is celebrated every December.
In 2018, entries were received from a total of 17,602 applicants (an application rate of 85.3%) and the best slogan from each business site was posted on a long strip of paper. Starting from 2016, the awarded slogans have also been posted at distributors.


Human Rights Week Activities at Each Base


Installation of banners (headquarters)


Installation of banners (Hirakata Plant)



Installation of standing signboards (Sakai Plant)


Awarding the winner of the human rights slogan contest
(Group company in Japan)



Implementation of human rights training (Tsukuba Plant)


Display of human rights slogans (Group company in Japan)

Protection of Privacy

From the perspective of respecting human rights and protecting privacy, Kubota conducts several inspections each year for each base to ensure there are no insufficiencies in investigation tasks such as credit surveys, and there are no problematic contents or descriptions from the perspective of human rights violation included in the investigation reports.


Developing Human Rights Leaders

Kubota appoints human rights leaders and holds a human rights leaders’ meeting every year, at which leaders explain their human rights advancement policies, give presentations on human rights advancement activities, and discuss the contents of human rights education.
Fieldwork training is also conducted twice a year (once in the eastern Japan area and once in the western Japan area). The participants learn about the local situation of the area by listening to lectures by external lecturers or persons actually involved in the lecture topic, and by walking around the local area.
In 2018, participants in the fieldwork for the eastern Japan area studied in Shinjuku, Tokyo, while the participants in the western Japan area in Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture, learned about the issue of discrimination against foreigners residing in Japan.


Eastern Japan area: Fieldwork training in Shinjuku, Tokyo (March 7, 2018)
Details: A lecture about “The History of Exchange Between Japan and Korea” and sightseeing at locations such as the Korea Museum, Japan Evangelical Lutheran Church, Islam Yokocho, and the Okubo Library (Participants: 14 people)

Western Japan region: Fieldwork training within Kobe, Hyogo Prefecture (March 13, 2018)
Details: A lecture about “Building a Town for Multicultural Coexistence,” and sightseeing at locations such as the area around Shin-Nagata Station, the Kobe Foreigners Friendship Center, the Kobe Korean Educational Culture Center, the Honmachi-suji shopping street, the Marugo Market, the Taisho-suji shopping street, Daikoku Park, Tetsujin-hiroba Plaza, and Takatori Catholic Church (Participants: 23 people)

Respecting Human Rights throughout the Supply Chain

Kubota declares in the Kubota Group Charter for Action, “we do not permit forced labor or child labor, and also request our business partners to comply in this regard.”
Also, in its CSR Procurement Guidelines, Kubota declares that it does not permit forced labor or child labor, and also requests that its suppliers comply in this regard. The Guidelines also clearly prohibit the use of conflict minerals,(*) which are a source of funds for armed insurgents.
In May 2017, the Kubota Group released its Group statement with regard to the UK Modern Slavery Act, and has updated its statement each year, which can be seen on our website.
In May 2017, the Kubota Group released its Group statement with regard to the UK Modern Slavery Act, and has updated its statement each year, which can be seen on our website.



  • Tantalum, tin, tungsten and gold and their derivatives, produced in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and its neighboring countries, which constitute a source of funds for armed insurgents, who have repeatedly committed inhumane acts in these countries.

Awareness Survey on Harassment

An awareness survey on harassment is conducted collaboratively by the labor union and the Human Rights Advancement Department, targeting Kubota employees. The results of the survey are released through the Company intranet and on the newsletter distributed to union members. Details are explained in human rights education programs, etc.

External Related Organizations

Kubota participates in the external organizations below and is working to create a discrimination-free society.


  • The Corporate Federation for Dowa and Human Rights Issues, Osaka (also participating in Shiga, Wakayama, Hyogo, Chiba and Hiroshima)
  • Osaka City Corporate Human Rights Promotion Council (with related organizations in each municipality)
  • The Center for Fair Recruitment and Human Rights Advancement
  • Multi-Ethnic Human Rights Education Center for Pro-existence
  • Osaka Career Support & Talent Enhancement Plaza
  • Buraku Liberation and Human Rights Research Institute, etc.

Related Information

Kubota's research and development values thorough hands-on approach. As an agricultural and water expert, we challenge and attain the future of food, water, and the environment, realizing our customer's needs.

This is the Kubota Global website. The Kubota Tractor Corporation (USA) website has moved to www.kubotausa.com. Please choose the correct website below to continue.

�E�We use cookies to remember this setting. You can disable the cookies in your browser setting.

pagetop